Blog Archives • WiTricity https://witricity.com/posts/blog/ Just park. And charge. Wed, 06 Dec 2023 22:17:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.3.2 https://witricity.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/cropped-favicon-1-32x32.png Blog Archives • WiTricity https://witricity.com/posts/blog/ 32 32 Why OEMs Should Care about SAE’s Latest Wireless Charging Standard https://witricity.com/newsroom/in-the-news/why-oems-should-care-about-saes-latest-wireless-charging-standard/ Thu, 07 Dec 2023 14:00:29 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=8693 by Ky Sealy, Sr. Principal Engineer, WiTricity SAE International recently announced that the organization had agreed on Differential Inductive Positioning System (DIPS) as the technology alignment methodology for the SAE J2954 standard. This is a great addition to the existing J2954 standard that was first ratified in 2020. But what does this mean? In short:...

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by Ky Sealy, Sr. Principal Engineer, WiTricity

SAE International recently announced that the organization had agreed on Differential Inductive Positioning System (DIPS) as the technology alignment methodology for the SAE J2954 standard. This is a great addition to the existing J2954 standard that was first ratified in 2020. But what does this mean?

In short: interoperability, consistency, and commercial adoption.

Interior garage with a window, wall mount, and wireless charging pad, featuring a red electric car.For every car manufacturer, infrastructure provider, and Tier 1 provider thinking about wireless EV charging, this is a great step forward in ensuring interoperability for public deployment. I chair the SAE J2954 Alignment and Controls sub-team and intimately understand the time and effort that went into evaluating several positioning options (including work done by third-party testing firms) and finally coalescing around a position detection system that the industry can depend on, and one which strengthens the J2954 standards. The technology behind DIPS is intimately familiar to WiTricity from our early and ground-breaking work on wireless power transfer.

WiTricity has been a pioneer in wireless charging for electric vehicles, leading the development and implementation of magnetic resonance technology across both passenger and commercial vehicles alike. We have been involved with SAE since wireless EV charging standards discussions began and were integral in helping establish the J2954 standards. With this work on a standard position detection system, we continue to lead the industry in ensuring interoperability across vehicles and infrastructure.

To clarify, this standard (once finalized) will be the minimum alignment methodology (fine alignment, pairing, and alignment check) for public infrastructure and light duty vehicles. It is not required for private use nor for buses, heavy duty trucks, or other commercial vehicles.

For those wondering what this means for the automotive industry, the standard will add flexibility for parking alignment within wireless power transfer, i.e., SAE has added minimum requirements for ground infrastructure to assist vehicles with final alignment. While there were many options before, this guarantees interoperability for any vehicle in a public setting.

An exciting outgrowth of this standard is its use in autonomous vehicles and automated parking. Vehicles that park by themselves will now have improved parking accuracy – and the ability to begin charging immediately – without human involvement.

I look forward to this standard being finalized so we can continue to move forward in making wireless EV charging available – and accessible – to all.

 

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Japan’s Love for Technology and Convenience is a Perfect Match for Wireless EV Charging https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/japans-love-for-technology-and-convenience-is-a-perfect-match-for-wireless-ev-charging/ Wed, 06 Dec 2023 14:00:31 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=8652 Japan is a country known for a deep-rooted appreciation for technology, a persistent pursuit of convenience, and a love for innovative solutions to everyday challenges. In a world where electric vehicle (EV) adoption is growing rapidly, Japan’s unique circumstances make it a prime candidate for the widespread adoption of wireless charging technology. The Space Dilemma...

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Japan is a country known for a deep-rooted appreciation for technology, a persistent pursuit of convenience, and a love for innovative solutions to everyday challenges. In a world where electric vehicle (EV) adoption is growing rapidly, Japan’s unique circumstances make it a prime candidate for the widespread adoption of wireless charging technology.

The Space Dilemma

One significant challenge Japan faces in EV adoption is the simple lack of space. Japan’s population distribution shows a distinctive pattern, primarily due to its mountainous terrain, which results in the concentration of people in specific regions. In a nation where 123 million residents occupy a region about the size of California (but with a population exceeding three times that of the state), over 90% of Japanese citizens live in densely populated urban centers like Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyoto [1], Given this situation Japanese cities have had to embrace innovative solutions, such as automated multi-story parking facilities, which have proven to be game-changers in Japan’s unique urban landscape. These inventive spaces enable vertical parking, minimizing the car’s spatial impact and significantly reducing the required space compared to traditional parking lots. As Japan contemplates the widespread adoption of electric vehicles another issue emerges: traditional bulky plug-in chargers, with their sprawling cables occupying significant space in already packed cities. And this is precisely where wireless charging could shine.

The Convenience of Wireless Charging

In a society where convenience is highly valued, wireless charging for EVs is a natural fit, mirroring the efficiency and accessibility appreciated in Japan’s iconic symbols of convenience, like ‘konbinis’ (convenience stores) – numbering nearly 60,000! – and ubiquitous vending machines – over 5.5 million – selling anything one may need (and not need). By eliminating the requirement for cables, extra maintenance, and, what’s equally important, the need to find time to go to the charging station, wireless charging could improve the EV ownership experience significantly. Being able to charge your car right where it’s parked – whether at work, the grocery store, or home – would make life much easier. This is why Japan is ready to embrace wireless EV charging with open arms.

Last but not least: Japan’s Tech Obsession

Let’s not forget that Japan has long been one of the global leaders in technology, with a culture that passionately welcomes cutting-edge innovations. From everyday small appliances to consumer electronics to robot hotels and cafes, the Land of the Rising Sun consistently pushes the boundaries of what’s possible. It’s no surprise that Japan has taken a keen interest in the future of transportation.

Japan’s Affection for Wireless Charging

Japan’s enthusiasm for wireless charging for electric vehicles is not just a theory; it’s been already grounded in real-world experience.

At the Decarbonized Management Expo in Tokyo this September, attendees got a hands-on introduction to the WiTricity Halo™ wireless charging system, courtesy of Sinanen, a leading Japanese energy solutions provider. Sinanen’s booth at the expo showcased a wide variety of decarbonization solutions, offering a glimpse into the future of a more convenient EV society, which includes wireless EV charging.

The recent cooperation between WiTricity and Sinanen to bring wireless charging to the streets of Japan is a testament to the country’s dedication to innovative solutions. This relationship signals the beginning of a revolution in how Japan powers its electric vehicles.

As Japan continues to embrace the future of transportation, wireless charging promises to be a major player in making EVs even more convenient, practical, and seamlessly integrated into the fabric of Japanese society. Japan’s love for technology and its dedication to convenience align perfectly with the potential of wireless charging, making it a match made in innovation heaven.

 

[1] https://www.cnn.com/2023/03/17/asia/japan-population-crisis-countryside-cities-intl-hnk-dst/index.html#:~:text=More%20than%2090%25%20of%20Japanese,on%2Dtime%20Shinkansen%20bullet%20trains

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Benefits of EV Driving: Are the Challenges Worth Ownership? https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/ev-benefits-and-ev-misconceptions-what-everyone-gets-wrong-about-evs/ Tue, 07 Nov 2023 14:00:19 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=7302 It seems that, wherever you look, electric vehicles are in the news. People either love them or hate them – there’s no in between! A lot of the “hate” seems based upon misconceptions (or myths) and unrealized benefits of EVs. We like busting myths at WiTricity so here goes: Common EV Misconceptions You Might Have...

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It seems that, wherever you look, electric vehicles are in the news. People either love them or hate them – there’s no in between! A lot of the “hate” seems based upon misconceptions (or myths) and unrealized benefits of EVs. We like busting myths at WiTricity so here goes:

Common EV Misconceptions You Might Have Heard About

Myth: Range anxiety – EVs don’t have enough range.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, Americans drive an average of 40 miles a day. Even the shortest-range electric vehicles can travel more than twice that distance before needing to be charge. Many can now travel over 200 miles on a charge with the Lucid Air surpassing 500 miles. Unless you drive very long distances regularly, you may be surprised to learn how well an EV can fit into your routine.

Myths: There is nowhere to charge.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, 80% of charging occurs at home. That’s because while you don’t have a gas pump in your garage or carport, you have electricity. You may find that the Level 1 charger that comes with your car gives you enough juice overnight, or you may want to add a faster Level 2 charger. If you live where you don’t have a dedicated spot to park or to charge on the road, you’ll find over 51,000 stations in the U.S. available to the public. Granted, there are many rural areas where EV chargers are few and far between and drivers typically travel longer distances. The Inflation Reduction Act is focusing on filling in these gaps. In the meantime, a hybrid (or plug-in hybrid) may be the answer for you.

Myth: Electric vehicles are not as safe as comparable internal combustion (gasoline) vehicles.

We’ve all seen the stories of EV battery fires. But how often do you hear about ICE vehicles catching fire? Although you may not hear about them, they do, and have been for decades – it’s what’s new that gets all the attention. That’s why it’s good to know that electric vehicles must meet the same safety standards as conventional vehicles. All light duty cars and trucks sold in the United States must meet the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. Separately, EV battery packs must meet their own testing standards.

Myth: EVs are as slow as molasses (or golf carts).

First, there’s a difference between “quick” and “fast.” Quick means how long it takes to get from Point A to Point B. Fast means the top speed a vehicle reaches. Electric vehicles are generally quicker from 0 to 60, which can make a difference when merging into traffic. Why? EV motors generate 100% of their available torque instantly. When the driver of an EV pushes down on the accelerator, the transition from stationary to speed is almost instantaneous. But yes, a gas vehicle can maintain a faster top speed.

Myth: EV batteries don’t last long.

A recent survey showed that the average new car buyer holds onto their car for 8.4 years (some longer, some less of course). Depending on what you read – or what you’ve heard – EV batteries last 8-10 or 15-20 years. With electric vehicles federally mandated to carry separate warranties for their battery packs for at least eight years or 100,000 miles, the average new EV car buyer shouldn’t have to worry about their battery. You can also take steps to maximize the life of your battery.

Benefits of EV Driving: Why the Pros Outweigh the Cons

Now that we’ve busted a few myths, let’s look at the benefits of owning an electric vehicle.

Benefit: Save on fuel costs.

Although gas prices go up and down (more up recently, than down), electric car charging costs roughly half the price of powering a standard gasoline car for driving the same distance. Many electric utilities offer special time-of-use rates that vary based on the time of day when energy is used. Off-peak rates offer much lower charging costs, and electric cars can be programmed to charge when you want.

Benefit: Save on maintenance costs.

Since electric motors have far fewer moving parts and never require oil changes, new spark plugs or fuel filters, you save on vehicle maintenance. Regenerative braking also extends the lifespan of brake pads by using the electric motor to decelerate the vehicle.

Benefit: You help save our planet.

There’s a lot of talk about carbon emissions, air pollution, and saving the planet. Whether you believe EVs help save our planet or not (though the evidence suggests they help), an electric car (in full electric mode) produces zero tailpipe emissions. The result is lower smog and greenhouse gas emissions. This is true even after accounting for the power plant emissions from the electricity to charge them. In over a year, just one electric car on the road can save an average of 1.5 million grams of CO2.

Benefit: Do you really like going to the gas station?

Unlike a gas-powered vehicle, where getting gas is the destination, you can charge many of the places you already go – shopping, restaurants, banking, etc. Even while sleeping. Each time you stop, you can power up your vehicle and extend your range. No need to go to the gas station. Ever.

Benefit: EVs are quiet.

EVs are so quiet that car manufacturers have had to add sound when EVs are put into reverse! Many drivers find a quiet drive to be a less stressful drive. As do your neighbors when you leave for work early in the morning.

Bonus benefit of ev ownership will soon be the opportunity to charge it wirelessly. No need to get out of the car to charge, nor hassle with the cord or plug. Simply park and charge™. Learn more.

While we’re on the topic of benefits, there are a lot of benefits to wireless charging. No more having to remember to charge. No more getting out of the car to charge. And no more wrangling with a cord in a dark place. Just to name a few.  Like EVs, themselves, many myths surround wireless charging. Check out the Related Assets below.

Related Assets:

Five Myths of Wireless Charging

Top 5 Myths of Wireless EV Charging

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7 Steps to Electrifying Your Fleet https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/7-steps-to-electrifying-your-fleet/ Tue, 07 Nov 2023 13:45:50 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=8577 by Eric Cohen If you manage a fleet, I’m sure that electrifying it is something you think about often. How? When? How much? The more answers you get, the more questions arise. Here are seven steps that can help get you started. Know when it’s the right time to electrify How do you know when...

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by Eric Cohen

If you manage a fleet, I’m sure that electrifying it is something you think about often. How? When? How much? The more answers you get, the more questions arise. Here are seven steps that can help get you started.

  1. Know when it’s the right time to electrify

How do you know when is the right time for to electrify your fleet? If a statute requires it, you’re directed by leadership, a grant funding opportunity arises or … your drivers are requesting it! Any one of these actions – or a combination of them – can jumpstart your process. But to begin the process, it’s important to understand the benefits of fleet electrification.

  1. Justify your electrification costs

There are many benefits to fleet electrification, but one of the most important is a reduced total cost of ownership (TCO). Yes, the upfront costs of electrification can be overwhelming, but reduced maintenance, operating costs, and fueling on the backend can make up the difference. In addition, incentive funding on the front end can reduce your acquisition costs. And don’t forget to calculate a dollar value on reduced emissions as part of your total justification.

  1. Engage your drivers

A great place to start your electrification journey is by training drivers to drive an electric vehicle. Once they become comfortable behind the wheel, and with the daily activities to support an EV, they will quickly become advocates. Many like the quietness of the trucks, the acceleration, no diesel smell, and less vibration in the tractor. A large part of the comfort factor is that they’re automatic, so easier to drive.

  1. Focus on charging infrastructure

Before purchasing new vehicles, begin to investigate your infrastructure. You can operate a charger without a vehicle, but you can’t operate an electric vehicle without a charger. Consider incorporating solar power with battery backup into your infrastructure, along with wireless charging. No cables. No free-standing chargers. And no maintenance. Be sure your chargers match your vehicles so you can test compatibility, customer service, and downtime when evaluating electrification consideration.

  1. Align EV purchases with infrastructure growth

Always align your EV purchases with infrastructure growth; as you expand, take into account that electrical charging requires additional electrical supply. And, as you look at power, think about the four levels of charging:

a. Getting power to the grid (and increasing it as the need expands)

b. Getting power to the facility

c. Getting power to the charger

d. Getting power to the vehicle

  1. Work with your utility

A major player in your fleet electrification is your utility. You can’t do this without them. Ask about their load capacity. Ask about programs to help offset costs. And ask about permitting fees. Most importantly, get them involved early in your planning process. They’re happy to know you’re electrifying as it’s new earnings opportunities through increased capital investments. From the ratepayer perspective, increased electric loads from EVs could reduce average all-in retail rates.

  1. Let funding availability help guide vehicle acquisition

You may only need eight new vehicles today, but if there’s funding for ten, take advantage of it. Grants, rebates, and special programs come and go. You never know how long they’ll last nor which vehicles will be covered. Funding to support your future growth today can help jumpstart your electrification program.

 

You’re going to make mistakes. We’re working in a rapidly evolving industry with rapidly evolving technology. Yes, some equipment will become obsolete, but you can’t wait until everything is perfect – and you have all the answers – before moving ahead. Get smart. Plan smart. Make decisions. And move forward.

Related Asset:

What Drains the Battery in a Car or EV? 7 Common Culprits

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The 80% Rule: Why You Shouldn’t Charge Your EV to 100% https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/the-80-rule/ https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/the-80-rule/#comments Mon, 06 Nov 2023 19:19:28 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=5460 By Craig Cole, Senior Editor, EV Pulse There are rules for everything. Pay your taxes… wear pants… don’t drive on the sidewalk … and if you own an electric vehicle, you need to be aware of the “80% rule.” Why is 80% an important number if you own an electric car, crossover, or pick-up? There...

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By Craig Cole, Senior Editor, EV Pulse

There are rules for everything. Pay your taxes… wear pants… don’t drive on the sidewalk … and if you own an electric vehicle, you need to be aware of the “80% rule.” Why is 80% an important number if you own an electric car, crossover, or pick-up?

There are two reasons: charging performance and battery longevity. Most of the time you should only charge an EV to 80% because charging rates slow down dramatically past the 80% mark. And two, the long-term health of your vehicle’s battery pack is improved when kept below 100%.

What does all this mean?

Concerning charging rates, a good example is the Hyundai Ioniq 5 with the optional, long-range battery. This hatchback-like crossover can DC fast charge from 10 to 80% in an incredibly quick 18 minutes. But it needs an additional 32 minutes to go from 80 to 100% – almost twice as long as it took to go from 10 to 80.

Why? Charging is not linear. Instead of batteries taking in energy at a constant, predictable rate, the rate actually changes based on a myriad of variables, though most importantly, the battery’s state of charge. Simply put, the fuller the battery is, the slower it absorbs energy. Imagine if a conventional car’s gas tank took longer and longer to fill up the closer it got to being full. It’s kind of crazy.

 

 

 

 

 

The best analogy I’ve heard for why charging slows down is that batteries are like theater seating. When you’re one of the first people to enter, it’s quick and easy to find a chair – you can sit anywhere – but as the theater fills up, it takes a lot longer to snag a spot and sit down. In the Li-MAX Cineplex above, the electrons are climbing over each other and spilling popcorn everywhere!

It’s important to know about the “80 % rule” if you’re on a long-distance drive in an EV. When it’s time to charge, it’s often smarter to stop at 80% and then get back on the road, instead of waiting for the battery to completely fill up. Doing so maximizes your use of time.

For example, if your EV has 300 miles of range when fully juiced up, that means it can go about 240 miles with an 80% state of charge. (Obviously, you’re going to stop and power up before hitting zero miles, but let’s keep things simple and say 240.) If the 0-to-80% recharge time is 40 minutes, you can hit the road in little more than half an hour. If you want to fully replenish the battery, it could realistically take an additional 90 minutes to go from 80 to 100%. In the time it took you to gain that extra range, you could be a hundred miles or more down the road and in the vicinity of another charger. That’s why stopping at 80% usually makes the most sense (though that is something YOU have to determine).

There are, of course, instances where you’ll want to wait longer to hit 100%. Maybe there are huge distances between DC fast chargers, and you need every bit of range you can get. It could be the dead of winter and you have range anxiety about making it to your destination. Or you’re towing a car or boat, and the extra weight means you need the additional kilowatt-hours to get you to the next charging station.

The other reason to avoid going all the way to 100 is because it can help preserve battery life. Whether it’s a phone, cordless drill, or your car, batteries simply don’t like to be full. Keeping them topped to the brim means, over time, the maximum kilowatt-hours they can hold shrinks faster than it would otherwise. Always concerned about warranty costs, automakers even suggest limiting how much you charge. Car companies make this easy to do with an infotainment system that allows you to set your preferred charge level – even when you’re not at home.

It’s important to note that you can charge your EV to 100%, but it’s just that for optimal battery life over the long haul, charging to a lower percentage is a good idea. It’s like changing engine oil in an old-school vehicle. You can follow the manufacturer’s recommendation, but doing it more frequently is never a bad idea, especially if you plan on keeping your car or truck for years and years.

Related Assets:

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Craig Cole is Senior Editor at EV Pulse. He brings 15 years of experience to EV Pulse and is a proud member of the Automotive Press Association and the Midwest Automotive Media Association. Check out the EV Pulse YouTube channel here.

 

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10 Tips for EV Etiquette https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/10-tips-for-ev-etiquette/ Wed, 01 Nov 2023 13:00:45 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=7496 By Craig Cole, Senior Editor EV Pulse Do you know how to be a good electric vehicle owner? Electric vehicles are different, and a lot of drivers don’t have experience with them, so they don’t know the best ways to use their battery-powered cars and trucks. To help you avoid any faux pas, here are...

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By Craig Cole, Senior Editor EV Pulse

Do you know how to be a good electric vehicle owner? Electric vehicles are different, and a lot of drivers don’t have experience with them, so they don’t know the best ways to use their battery-powered cars and trucks. To help you avoid any faux pas, here are 10 simple dos and don’ts to make sure everyone has a good EV experience.

Tip No. 1 – DO use an appropriate charger for your vehicle.

If you drive a Chevy Bolt that DC fast charges at a maximum of around 55 kW, there’s absolutely no reason to plug into a 350-kW charger. Your car’s battery will NOT juice up any quicker and you WILL irritate and annoy any Hummer EV or Hyundai E-GMP drivers that need to DC fast charge. So, know what your vehicle is capable of and use the appropriate hardware. You might also consider wireless charging.

Tip No. 2DON’T DC fast charge to 100% unless you absolutely have to.

There are situations where this might be necessary, but they’re rare in everyday use. Most EVs charge the quickest from 10 to 80%. Beyond this range, the speed PLUMMETS, meaning that getting the last 20% can take longer than the previous 70. Look at the Hyundai Ioniq 5, for instance. In our testing, it DC fast charged from 10 to 80% in a lickety-split 18 minutes, exactly like the manufacturer said. But going from 80 to 100% required 32 additional minutes. So, be courteous and avoid hogging a charger if you don’t need to. Check out this blog post for more on this very important topic.

Tip No. 3 – DO move your vehicle as quickly as reasonably possible when finished charging.

By not moving, you’re blocking other drivers. Few things are more frustrating than waiting to reenergize your EV and there’s another vehicle in the way, one that’s done charging. Operators disincentivize outlet obstructing by charging users idle fees when they’re plugged in and not juicing up. But still, be courteous and vacate the stall as soon as you reasonably can.

Tip No. 4 – DON’T unplug other EVs.

Just like you should have been taught as a child, keep your hands to yourself and don’t touch other people’s stuff. J It doesn’t matter if a vehicle is at 97% or even if charging is complete. Be kind and don’t interrupt another person’s session, even if they need to learn tips No. 2 and 3 above.

Tip No. 5 – When you’re done charging, DO put the cable back where it belongs.

Connectors usually click into a holster on the power dispenser’s cabinet. Doing this keeps the plug end, and much of the cable, up off the ground where these parts are less likely to get dirty or damaged. Please don’t lazily dump the cable on the asphalt where the next person could run over. it That’s not good for anyone. It’s also worth noting, sometimes Tesla owners leave Supercharger cables unhooked if the station doesn’t work. This is a way of signaling the problem to other drivers. And remember … with wireless charging, you don’t have to worry about a cable because there aren’t any! Simply park and charge.

Tip No. 6 – DON’T public charge unless you need to.

If you’re driving to the grocery store, then heading home after shopping, and your battery is at 95%, reconsider using a DC fast charger that another driver might need. The US public charging infrastructure is still a regrettably finite resource, so if you’ve got plenty of range and you’re just heading home, think of other motorists who might need to charge more than you do.

Tip No 7 – DO unhitch your trailer while charging.

Yes, this can be a major pain, but unless the parking lot where chargers are located is massive or otherwise empty, it’s courteous to disconnect your trailer while charging so you don’t block traffic or access to other chargers.

Tip No. 8 – DON’T use a non-Tesla charger if you drive a Tesla.

Tesla Superchargers are plentiful, reliable, and incredibly convenient, so, please don’t feel the need to power up at an EV Go, ChargePoint, or Electrify America station unless you absolutely have to. Try to save those brand-agnostic options for other EV drivers. They WILL thank you.

Tip No. 9 – DO exercise common courtesy.

When charging …

  • Park neatly between the lines so you don’t block access for others.
  • Avoid cranking your music to obnoxious levels while chilling and charging.
  • Don’t leave any garbage behind in the parking lot.

A little thoughtfulness goes a long way toward making the EV experience a positive one for all drivers.

Tip No. 10 – If you can help it, DON’T use the same charger as another driver.

Of course, this is NOT always possible. Use your judgement and try to avoid plugging into the same charging cabinet as someone else. Many chargers are load balanced, meaning they share a certain amount of power. So, if you start pulling electricity from the same cabinet, you could significantly reduce the other driver’s charging speed. Again, this is NOT always possible, but use a separate charger if you can.

Thanks for being part of our EV community and helping everyone to have a positive electric vehicle experience.

 

Craig Cole is Senior Editor at EV Pulse. He brings 15 years of experience to EV Pulse and is a proud member of the Automotive Press Association and the Midwest Automotive Media Association. Check out the EV Pulse YouTube channel here.

Related Assets:

Benefits of EV Driving: Are the Challenges Worth Ownership?

What Drains the Battery in a Car or EV? 7 Common Culprits

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How You Charge Your EV Battery Matters https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/how-you-charge-your-ev-battery-matters/ Tue, 31 Oct 2023 15:25:36 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=7179 by Morris Kesler, CTO, and Oguz Atasoy, Senior Staff Scientist, WiTricity Based on the popularity of our 80% Rule blog post, it’s obvious there’s a lot of interest in increasing an electric vehicle’s battery life. So here are two additional tips for charging that can have a direct impact on your battery’s lifetime. Using a...

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by Morris Kesler, CTO, and Oguz Atasoy, Senior Staff Scientist, WiTricity

Based on the popularity of our 80% Rule blog post, it’s obvious there’s a lot of interest in increasing an electric vehicle’s battery life. So here are two additional tips for charging that can have a direct impact on your battery’s lifetime.

Using a Derating Approach Can Extend the Life of Your EV Battery

Derating? What’s that? Let’s start with a couple definitions.

State of charge (SOC) is the ratio of the energy in the battery relative to the maximum energy that the battery can hold. A fully charged battery has 100% SOC, while a totally empty battery has 0% SOC. Generally, EVs have battery management systems that prevent these extremes.

Derating? It’s the operation of a device at less than its maximum capability in order to ensure safety, reduce degradation, and avoid system shutdown.

The battery in your EV is one of the most expensive components of the car, so protecting it is critical. Derating is one approach for extending the life of the battery. Better still, derating can be implemented easily and has no impact on system reliability.

It’s time to rethink your charging behavior and forget the gas station model you grew up with. Most people driving an ICE vehicle wait until the gas tank gets low and then fills it up to the top. This brings us to …

Rule #1: Don’t completely deplete your battery and minimize 100% SOC. Electric cars already have an installed battery management system that prevents the battery from being charged and discharged at the extremes of SOC, and every EV manufacturer has charging recommendations for their individual models. So, in general, don’t regularly charge to more than 90% or drop below 10%. Yes, it’s ok to charge to 100% (if the car will allow it) for a long trip, but the optimum charging range for maintaining battery integrity in most electric vehicles is 25-75%. It will improve the overall lifespan of your battery.

Rule #2: Fast is not your friend. Don’t rely on fast charging to meet your day-to-day charging needs. Unless you’re going long distances, it’s important to use a Level 2 (or equivalent) charger for daily charging. Fast charging puts more stress on a battery and reduces battery life and, as a result, the battery will drain faster.

It’s hard to break old habits but, with an electric vehicle, you have an opportunity to create new habits that will prolong the life of your vehicle. To explore more about EV charging,  check out this blog post.

Battery derating will become easier when there is pervasive wireless charging. Then, wherever you go or wherever you park, you can get a little Power Snack™ so you’ll always have sufficient battery power, Goldilocks style. Not too much, not too little, just right.

Related Asset:

What Drains the Battery in a Car or EV? 7 Common Culprits

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What Doesn’t Go Bump in the Night? https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/what-doesnt-go-bump-in-the-night/ Tue, 31 Oct 2023 12:45:17 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=8572 by Eric Cohen As Halloween rolls around, thoughts always go toward things dark and creepy. Eerie and mysterious. And, of course, jack-o-lanterns and trick or treating. This year, however, I’m thinking about the scary side of charging an electric vehicle. I’ve spoken to a lot of EV owners (and EV wannabes) over the past two...

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by Eric Cohen

As Halloween rolls around, thoughts always go toward things dark and creepy. Eerie and mysterious. And, of course, jack-o-lanterns and trick or treating.

This year, however, I’m thinking about the scary side of charging an electric vehicle. I’ve spoken to a lot of EV owners (and EV wannabes) over the past two years (check out the Charger blog posts or the two eBooks). Inevitably, their stories turn to the dark side of charging their electric vehicles. Whether it’s having to charge at a dimly lit location in the back of a parking lot, or only finding broken/non-functioning chargers, drivers find the situation frustrating and confounding. Many have relayed stories of finding a charger, scanning the area, jumping out to plug in, and quickly getting back in their car and locking the door until charging is completed. Is it ghosts they see off in the distance? Is it rain pelting down likes cats and dogs? Or is it the werewolves crying in the distance? Maybe it’s just that uneasy feeling you get when you’re the only one out there with no one around.

Wireless charging eliminates the scary side of EV charging. Simply park and charge. Whether it’s in front of Dracula’s castle or in a dark parking lot, with wireless EV charging there would be no need to get out of your car to charge. Pull over the charging pad and charging begins immediately. When you’re done,  you simply drive away and leave those ghosts in the dust!

Related Asset:

Meet Your EV Consumer

 

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EV Charging: Don’t Get Stuck in the Speed Trap https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/ev-charging-dont-get-stuck-in-the-speed-trap/ Tue, 24 Oct 2023 13:00:17 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=8145 By Amy Barzdukas, CMO, WiTricity The shift from traditional gas- and diesel-powered vehicles to electric vehicles is here – and it’s a huge shift in many ways. In fact, the last time we felt a vehicle transition shift of this magnitude, was the change from horse and buggy to the horseless carriage. And, just like...

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By Amy Barzdukas, CMO, WiTricity

The shift from traditional gas- and diesel-powered vehicles to electric vehicles is here – and it’s a huge shift in many ways. In fact, the last time we felt a vehicle transition shift of this magnitude, was the change from horse and buggy to the horseless carriage.

And, just like today, there were naysayers. One of the prevalent trains of thought was that by taking away the horse – and the horse sense that came with it – cars wouldn’t be safe. Drivers would have to pay attention to the road! (An interesting counterpoint to today’s concern about autonomy being unsafe because the driver isn’t paying attention.)

But this is just human nature: we understand new things by comparing to the things we already know. And right now, people know gas stations, so they want to make EV charging work the same way.

Can You “Logic” People Through a Paradigm Shift?

Once a new paradigm becomes dominant, the change is obvious. The key to managing a paradigm shift is time. People are comfortable with the status quo and get nervous about change. But when you start to think about it, you realize that trying to replicate the gas station model won’t really work. Sure, you need fast charging when going long distances, but for most city driving?

  • You can’t charge an EV in the same amount of time as you can charge a gas vehicle, which is 3-4 minutes. Even the fastest EV charger takes a lot longer to fully charge your vehicle.
  • If everyone were to charge their EVs as fast as possible, that would mean everyone used DC fast chargers (DCFC). And the grid would struggle mightily to keep up. The average US household uses 29.5 kWh ­per day. You can easily use that (or more) in a 30- minute session at a DCFC. If that charger were used just 20 hours out of any given 24, that would require 1,200 kWh – enough to power 40 homes.
  • Replicating the gas station model with fast chargers is an enormous undertaking – both in cost and infrastructure. Imagine all our cities being dug up, rewired, and then put back again to get expensive chargers on every corner where we have gas stations today.

Electricity is the Difference

The key difference between charging with electricity versus gas is that electricity, unlike gas, is safely delivered to most homes and workplaces. And what do cars do at home and at the workplace? They park. So, if you have a clean, safe supply of electricity at home and at work, that’s where most of the charging should happen: where the cars are already parked, for hours at a time.

What does it take to make people accept EVs as GREAT cars, not replacements for what they know?

It takes both experience and education. Our research found that battery range anxiety is common among people who don’t own an EV – 41% of EV Considerers are worried that they won’t be able to go as far as they need to go on a single charge. Conversely, those who have made the leap to EV ownership are 50% less likely to share that concern. EV Owners are also 50% less likely to worry about the time it takes to charge. Why? EV Owners report driving an average of 97 miles/day, which is well within the battery range of today’s EVs, and most (74%) charge at home.

The EV paradigm shift we need the market, customers, partners, and everyone to understand is that for most cars and drivers, bringing charging to where your car is parked – at night or at work – is a benefit rather than a problem. All charging does not need to be fast, faster, faster. That’s a speed trap we need to avoid.

Consumers are Ready

We’ve talked to many drivers – both owners of electric vehicles and those considering an EV. Overwhelmingly, they want to switch to electric (if they haven’t already). They also want wireless charging, but that’s for another blog post! Check out their stories in our two eBooks – Meet Your Consumer, Volume 1 and Volume 2 – where you can hear why they made – or want to make – a change from internal combustion/gas guzzling to electric vehicle.

We invited consumers – people who drive EVs and those considering an EV purchase – to share their stories. What led them to making an EV decision? What do they like about their EVs? They talked and we listened. These eBooks are an outgrowth of those discussions – each one a personal story. We were inspired by their stories and know you will be, too

 

Related Asset:

How You Charge Your EV Battery Matters

 

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What Drains the Battery in a Car or EV? 7 Common Culprits https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/what-7-things-drain-your-ev-battery-the-most/ https://witricity.com/newsroom/blog/what-7-things-drain-your-ev-battery-the-most/#comments Tue, 17 Oct 2023 12:30:50 +0000 https://witricity.com/?p=7132 There are a lot of misconceptions about what drains the battery in a car the most. Vehicle owners – especially EV owners – have to think about range. What can you do to enhance the battery performance in your EV? Check out this list to see if you’re taking the right steps to keep your...

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There are a lot of misconceptions about what drains the battery in a car the most. Vehicle owners – especially EV owners – have to think about range. What can you do to enhance the battery performance in your EV? Check out this list to see if you’re taking the right steps to keep your battery in top form.

7 Things that Drain the Battery Most in a Car or EV

1. City vs. Highway Driving

This is a key difference between electric vehicles and gas-powered cars: EVs typically get better mileage driving in the city compared to cruising down the interstate. Why?  Electric cars have regenerative braking systems that put some energy back into the battery when coasting and braking. Steady driving at highway speed drains the battery much faster than driving in stop-and-go traffic – but anywhere you are driving, freeway or side road, driving faster consumes more of your battery than driving slower.

2. Acceleration

Smooth and steady is the trick here: don’t have a lead foot! Let up a bit to extend your battery’s range. A big pop of acceleration requires a quick jolt of energy, which is more demanding on the battery than a nice, easy acceleration. (EV owners know that fast starts are awfully tempting, though – quick acceleration is one way that electric vehicles really stand out from their ICE brethren.)

3. Watch the Weather

Cold temperatures can drain your battery substantially faster than mild temperatures. As a result, you’ll need to charge your EV more frequently during the winter months. In fact, a recent study shows that EV range can drop by up to 32% in freezing temperatures. One helpful hint is to pre-heat the battery before starting to drive (and pre-cool during summer’s heat) – your car may have settings to enable this. By doing this, you’re drawing electricity from your home’s electrical system and not the car, and you’re starting with a full battery. It also warms the battery to optimum temperature, which helps preserve the battery cells. But we should also remind you, that if you get stuck on a snowy highway, keeping warm in the car will last a good long time.

4. Heating and Air Conditioning

It takes more energy to keep your car’s interior warm during extreme cold (and cool during extreme heat). Bumping up the heat or air conditioning for comfort while driving takes more energy from the battery. Controlling the interior and battery temperature is the biggest power drain second to driving the vehicle. Electric cars aren’t able to draft off the heat of the engine to warm the cabin like ICE vehicles can. But – a nice way to stay warm without blasting the heat is to turn on the heated seats, if you have them. They use a lot less energy to keep you warm.

5. Battery Charging

Everyone’s natural inclination is to charge their battery to 100% – the more it’s charged, the further you can drive, right? But continually charging to 100% will deplete your battery’s life. Optimal charging? 80%. It’s important to be aware of how quickly you’re charging since many fast chargers can quickly bring your EV up to 80% in as little as 30 minutes. Stick with Level 2 charging unless you’re on a long road trip and need to refuel between stops.

6. Navigation and Infotainment Systems

Everything electric ultimately uses your battery, from the larger infotainment systems along the dashboard to rear passenger screens to USB ports. The good news, though, is that all those electronics *might* equate to about a mile of range per hour of driving. Not a lot! So listen to that music and enjoy the ambient lighting.

7. Identify Your Usage and Minimize What Drains the Battery in Your Car

The more you know, the more you can save. Many EVs can show you what functions of the car are using the most battery poser. You can also check key stats, such as battery health and average range per trip. Enjoy the drive!

And don’t forget that how you charge your EV battery matters. This blog post offers more tips to help make owning an electric vehicle easy and fun!

Efficient Driving Begins With Knowledge and Awareness

Understanding what drains the battery in a car or EV is crucial for maximizing its performance and range. As vehicle owners, especially EV owners, strive to enhance their battery’s performance, they must consider various factors that impact battery consumption. By staying informed about your EV’s usage and making informed decisions, owners can extend their battery’s life and make the most of their electric vehicles. Remember, driving an EV is not only eco-friendly but also offers unique advantages that set it apart from traditional internal combustion engine vehicles. Enjoy the drive and make the most of your electric journey!

More tips to help you enjoy your ride:

The 80% Rule: Why You Shouldn’t Charge Your EV to 100%

How WiTricity Makes Charging Electric Cars Easier

Reducing Range Anxiety for Electric Vehicles

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